Romanian cinema at TIFF 2017

Two love stories with a twist represent the exciting Romanian segment at Toronto International Film Festival 2017.

“Ana, mon amour” (North American premiere) by award winning director Calin Peter Netzer and “Soldiers. Story from Ferentari” (world premiere) by Serbian-born Ivana Mladenovic are the two Romanian language movies at TIFF this year.

Here’s why you should not miss them.

**

Ana, mon amour (Image credit: Courtesy of TIFF)

“Ana, mon amour” is
a story about a man’s
struggle to find out
how the unseen, the
unspoken, even the
unthought shaped his
life.
“I think it’s important you understand what kept you
with Ana.” Toma is told during a therapy session.
The film doesn’t deal with the erosion of Toma’s
relationship with Ana, but rather with the actual
impossibility of properly building a relationship.
The lovers behave like communicating vessels in
physics; they flow into each other with their own
unfulfilled needs. They are caught up deeply in what
psychoanalysis calls transference: the redirection of
existing feelings and desires towards a new object.
The truth always finds a way to survive its denial.

(Director’s statement – source: press kit)

 

 

Soldiers. Story from Ferentari (Image credit: Courtesy of TIFF)
Set within Bucharest’s impoverished ghetto Ferentari, Ivana Mladenovic’s intimate narrative debut navigates the unexpected relationship that blossoms between a young anthropologist named Adi and Roma guide Alberto.

A daring and impressive debut, Ivana Mladenovic’s Soldiers. Story from Ferentari breaks taboos and boundaries through its portrayal of love and tenderness within the harsh environment of Romania’s marginalized Roma communities. A contemporary gay Romeo and JulietSoldiers progressively lays down its stoic armour as we move closer into its intimate story of love and companionship.

Based on the fictionalized biography of screenplay writer and lead actor Adrian Schiop, the film is set within the social borders of Bucharest’s impoverished Roma ghetto of Ferentari, where Adi, a thirty-something anthropologist, moves to begin his field research into manele pop music. Getting a feel for the local scene and searching for a guide, he meets Alberto, a portly and jovial Roma with a prison record and gambling habit. The two strike up a friendship that unexpectedly blossoms into amorous companionship. When their relationship, hidden away from discriminating eyes, eventually starts to falter, the realities of the ethnic and cultural power dynamics operating in their society are laid bare.

An unmistakable talent and a director to watch, Mladenovic lets Schiop play his fictional alter-ego alongside an ensemble of non-professionals. Present, but never intrusive, the camera captures the chemistry between the leads, casting an up-close gaze on the rarely observed queer and Roma cultures at the neglected periphery of Romanian society. Neither exploitative nor didactic, Soldiers delivers a tender love story that discusses isolation, intimacy, and being at the mercy of a society too quick to ostracize.

DIMITRI EIPIDES (source: courtesy of TIFF)

The Toronto International Film Festival runs from Sept. 7 to 17. More information at tiff.net.

 

1 Comment

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  1. Ar fi bine sa existe o trimitere spre traducere… dar poate este mai complicat sau exista si nu stiu eu sa o accesez.

    Despre film… este bine sa nu ascundem sub preş acest aspect al vietii dar nici nu imi place infrumusetarea unor dereglari morale Eu as aprecia mai mult un film axat pe o viata normala, nu înfrumuseţată, dar ” normala” in context cu situatia de fapt al unor relatii ieşite din linia aşa zis “normală” care se datoresc socieţii care condamnă dar nu se apleacă către cei mai putin pregatiti pentru viata si lupta pentru existenta…
    Aş avea multe de spus dar nu mă pasionează subiectul…

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